Return of the Attack of the Killer B-Movie

“If you’ve ever enjoyed a heaped helping of cheesy retro cinema goodness, this should put a grin on your face ”   Review of WIT’s Attack of the Killer B-Movie! During the 2016 Fringe

Hilarious titles. Ridiculous Monsters. All improvised.

WIT brings you a new improvised show following the classic elements of B-Movies. Join our unsuspecting cast, as a series of unfortunate events lead them to a horrifying discovery… who will survive? Who will find love? And why is the phone always dead when you need to call for help?!

The story will be influenced by suggested movie titles given to the cast by the audience – bring us your most ridiculous original B-Movie titles, and see what we create for you!

Now IT’S BACK, in the Scruffy Bunny Improv Theatre:

Next show Saturday January 27th 8.30pm, MORE DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON!!

Doorsales only, $10

 

 

Micetro cast

Micetro at the Scruffy Bunny – December 13th

Beloved improv elimination competition Micetro is back for another bite of the cheese.

A crew of eager improvisers will again battle head to head using wit, spur-of-the-moment storytelling and risking everything for an the love of the audience.  A mix of seasoned improvisers and adorable newcomers and everyone in between will play their hearts out to decide who gets eliminated and who survives to be crowned ‘Micetro’.

Price:
Koha, with a hat passed around at the end

When:
Wednesday December13th, 7pm–8pm

Where:
The Scruffy Bunny Improv Theatre, Ground Floor Reading Centre (where the Post Office used to be), Courtney Place, Wellington

Websites:
WIT Event Facebook Page

 

Short form fun show

Micetro at the Fringe Bar – November 30th

Beloved improv elimination competition Micetro is back for another bite of the cheese.

A crew of eager improvisers will again battle head to head using wit, spur-of-the-moment storytelling and risking everything for an the love of the audience.  A mix of seasoned improvisers and adorable newcomers and everyone in between will play their hearts out to decide who gets eliminated and who survives to be crowned ‘Micetro’.

Price:
Koha, with a hat passed around at the end

When:
Thursday November 30th, 7pm–8pm

Where:
The Fringe Bar, 26-32 Allen St, Te Aro, Wellington

Websites:
WIT Event Facebook Page

 

Tuesday Workouts in October/November 2017!

The Tuesday Workout is WIT’s regular training session if you’ve graduated from a WIT introductory course or have equivalent training and improv experience with another troupe.   In 2017 these are being run as koha – pay what you can, but don’t fret if you can’t.

We are usually in the Library Mezzanine Meeting Room, but sometimes in other spaces, as room bookings in Wellington were made just a little bit more tricky than usual by that darn earthquake last year.



Oct-3 Drama Christi Studio, 75 Taranaki St, by the Church, entrance round the back 6pm
Oct-10  Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm JAM NIGHT
Oct-17 NZIF holiday
Oct-24 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm
Oct-31 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm

Nov-7 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm
Nov-14 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm
Nov-21 to be confirmed
Nov-28 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm

Dec-5 Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room 6pm
Dec-12 (tbc) Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Room from 6pm Graduation show and JAM night

 

If you’d like to keep up with WIT’s training plans sign up to our Newsletter and you’ll know all the things!   If you have a quick question, a message to our Facebook page is often the quickest way to get in touch, or contact us through this handy form.

Read more about our training.

Note: If you are new to improv, Level 1 The Joy of Improvisation, runs through the Wellington Community Education Centre 4 times a year.

 

 

Micetro

How Micetro Works

A quick guide for players

Micetro, pronounced as ‘Maestro’, and indeed now called Maestro in many places.

This format was devised by Keith Johnston and is administered by the International Theatresports Institute.  It was created to allow performers of mixed abilities to work together. Typically there are 10-14 players (although in a large venue some groups play with up to 20), an MC, a musician and 1 or 2 directors and a lighting improvisor.

It is a game-of-a-game, with the players pretending to the audience that they are really serious about ‘competing’ with each other (stakes are high), although everyone is working together to create a great experience for the audience.  However, the feedback from the audience – who judge each scene – is quite real, an instant judgement on each scene.

In some shows the players are called by numbers, wearing big bold numbers on their clothes so the audience can see.  The person wearing number one will typically assume the persona of the “last week” or “last season” winner (real or not).

The directors choose for every scene the appropriate number of players, usually fishing name tags or numbers out of a hat, although these may be tweaked slightly to ensure that newer players are well supported. The directors explain the improv game to be played, may ask the audience for suggestions, direct and correct the scene.  Depending on the venue, suggestions may also be collected before the show, for example if the ‘pick up lines’ game is being played.

After each scene or game the audience decides, by cheering and applause how many points the scene should be awarded, with one being for a not-so-good scene, and a five a scene that made them laugh and cry.  Each player gets as many points as the scene he or she played in was awarded, although the MC may give or deduct extra points for good or ‘bad’ player behavior.  Note the “Last Name” rule.  If a director *really* wants you to stop the mischief, they will use your last name.   So, “Billy, it’s time to leave the stage” means “Billy, carry on”, while “Smithers, time to leave the stage” means really go now this has gone on too long.

Also, *be happy* if your scene is awarded a one or two, your audience have judged you correctly!  The evening will be much more interesting than if every scene is given a three.   Also, this is not a fair competition. Because it is not a competition.

Once everyone has played in a scene (or more often two), the players with the lowest score take a bow and leave, happily and gracefully, and the whole thing starts again.  Usually there are about five rounds in a one hour show. The directors generally ensure that that there are more group-games at the start of the evening, and more 2-person scenes or even monologues toward the end of the evening.

This is a fun format designed to be played with mixed bunches of experienced and not-so-experienced players, with challenges for all. Since players are immediately judged, it is perfectly possible to loose a star player near the start.  Being eliminated doesn’t mean someone is out of the show: there will be opportunities to leap back on stage when there’s a need for a forest in the background, or a backing chorus for a rousing song.

In the end there will be one player acclaimed Micetro: this is the signal for all the players to return to the stage and admire the winner.

Typical games you might expect to see in a WIT Micetro

Word at a time
Speak in one voice
Epic poem or Wanky Poem
Experts – either Arms Experts or Deaf Interpreter
Musical rollercoaster, or emotional rollercoaster
Numbers of words (speaking in sentences the length controlled by the director)
Touch to talk
Song, sonnet sermon
Rhyming Couplet scene
Opera
Foreign Film
Death in a Minute
Scene ending in I love you
Songs on a topic of the audiences choosing (typically folk or rock ballads)

[adapted from The Improv Encyclopedia itself sourced from the original source of all things Micetro, Keith Johnstone’s Impro for Storytellers]

Resources (or just make your own, these are just one guide) :
MC Sheet : Micetro Score Sheet_revised
Directors’ Notes : Micetrodirectorsheet

Short form fun show

Winter Micetro – June 2017

Beloved improv elimination competition Micetro came back for another bite of the cheese.

A crew of eager improvisers went head to head in a battle of wit, spur-of-the-moment storytelling and glorious failure.  A mix of seasoned improvisers and adorable newcomers, and everything in between played their hearts out to decide who got eliminated and who survived to be crowned ‘Micetro’.

Price:
Koha, with a hat passed around at the end

When:
Thursday June 1st, 7pm–8pm
Thursday June 8th, 7pm–8pm
Thursday June 15th, 7pm–8pm

Where:
The Fringe Bar, 26-32 Allen St, Te Aro, Wellington

Websites:
WIT Event Facebook Page

 

Vinny Francois, StoryCrafting 18th and 19th of March

vinniefrancois

Vinny Francois, StoryCrafting, 18th and 19th of March 2017

Vinny has over 20 years of experience as a professional improviser. A founding director of the Montreal Improv Theatre, he has performed in more shows and venues across Canada than he cares to count. Read his complete bio or watch Vinny in action.

The workshop:
Both days will be on storycrafting and yes you can sign up for just one day. The times will be between 10am to 5pm with an hour for lunch.

Storycrafting (narrative improv) (Intermediate/Advanced)
How do stories work? Learn how to weave a tale out of thin air whether it’s two minutes long or a whole hour. Start strong scenes, build the tension as the story evolves and finish it up on a high. Audiences LOVE being taken on a journey. This workshop teaches the structures, ideas and basics of narrative improv as it applies to individual scenes or improvised plays.

Purchasing tickets:
– go to www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/vinny-francois-storycrafting-18th-and-19th-of-march-tickets-32382180975
– Click on the button “SELECT A DATE” and choose “Sat, 18th Mar (10:00am)”.
– Once the date is selected click on the button “TICKETS”.
– You will now have the option to select one or both days.

Questions:
If you have any questions please email drentha@gmail.com